Who We Are

Spanning 5 cities and a headquarters in San Fransisco,
the League partners with leaders of each community to reimagine
how art & culture can impact social & physical landscapes.

 

What is a "Creative Interventionist" anyway?

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Words we live by

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What we do

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Why we love what we do... from a few of us

Hunter Franks, Founder

Hunter Franks, Founder

"I created the League because I believe that art can be used as a tool to create social change. When deployed in public spaces with the intent to ask questions and question answers it is unlike any other tool: accessible, breathable, touchable, informative, and powerful.

The League was born out of a desire to make the projects I was doing and the why behind the projects replicable and scalable. What would it look like if every city in the world was pushing back on the way things are and pushing toward creating moments of color, spontaneity, compassion, and equity?"

Anne Koller, Programs Director

Anne Koller, Programs Director

"Being in the League is like being a part of a family. You get to learn from, work with and be inspired by humans dedicated to making their communities and cities more vibrant and beautiful places to be.  This year I was so inspired by the work we were doing around the country to go back to my home city Milwaukee and childhood neighborhood to do work there.  Now I am talking with my former neighbors and new organizations in the area who are excited to activate my neighborhood park together."

Learn more about the projects we work on


Miguel Huerta, 2017 Fellow from Philadelphia 

Miguel Huerta, 2017 Fellow from Philadelphia 

Stephanie Barrale, 2017 Fellow from Philadelphia 

Stephanie Barrale, 2017 Fellow from Philadelphia 

"I’ve picked up the principle of whimsy - to me it means just being together. Hunter talks a lot about it, being light-hearted so that anyone can come up and get something out of the projects and get something out it. Later when you think about it more, it might mean more to you, but at the time you can just be there and participate. It isn't about taking an antagonistic lead, that is in-your-face; it’s just about coming together to see things in a different way. The challenge for each intervention is: what can you make that anyone in the city can engage in or be open to engaging.

"My favorite project was the Courage intervention in Clark Park in West Philly, in partnership with Uhuru. They have a flea market once a month and we set up a booth to collect submissions, asking people “Share a time when you acted courageously or wished you had.” There were little kids talking about their first time on the roller coaster. Someone shared how they outed their abuser within their music scene. Someone shared they were courageous in wearing a hijab after the recent election. One woman said, she doesn't consider herself courageous, she just puts her bra on one boob at a time.  We were there just to listen and talk and collect stories. We put the submissions into a zine and distributed them back into the community.  It was a beautiful day, with great conversations."

"I’m really interested in ways that citizens can leverage public space to gain ownership over public resources and collective narrative. Philadelphia is a rapidly changing city with few neighborhoods left untouched by gentrification and development.

The Creative Interventionists provides a rare opportunity to practice what, in Theaster Gates’s words, “ethical redevelopment” can look like.  It also feels important for artists, designers & city workers to use our respective leverage and positionality to amplify the voices most affected by blind development.  Frequently, this type of work can be prescriptive, so we try to be intentional and provide a platform for folks to use."

   Learn more about the Philadelphia Chapter


Claudia Amaro, 2017 Fellow from Wichita, Kansas 

Claudia Amaro, 2017 Fellow from Wichita, Kansas 

"Everything I do has to do with my beliefs. I believe in positivity because I love being a bridge between different cultures and love to learn as well.  I participate in different boards, mainly representing the Latino community, I also have a radio show in Spanish and speak to many people to create and motivate multicultural awareness."

 

Jenny Wiley, 2017 Fellow from Wichita, Kansas 

Jenny Wiley, 2017 Fellow from Wichita, Kansas 

"Our projects are incredibly important in Wichita right now. We see them as a bridge between different cultures, entrepreneurs, and businesses who until recently have been operating in silos in our city. There has been a huge push on re-invigorating the economy in Wichita, which is necessary and vital to the success of our city. Where I feel the League projects fill in is redefining and claiming the heart of the city -- our soul, our passions -- through the arts and community engagement. It's not just about dollar signs or brick and mortar businesses being rebuilt. We are a mosaic of beautiful cultures and a rich history, and we get to celebrate these things in the intervention projects we complete for Wichita.

I believe that safe spaces can be created anywhere, anytime, whether it's in the middle of a highway or in a small meditation group. By tapping into these spaces, we can practice curiosity and non-judgement, and not only transform ourselves but also uncover creative solutions and reconnect to ourselves and others. This is the lifeblood, the thread that connects me to my community and my work."

Learn more about the Wichita Chapter


"As someone who is interested in the human element of design, it is imperative to me to grasp opportunities for creative intervention as necessary work. The ability of the League to work swiftly and engage on a human-scale allows for authentic, difficult, messy, and fun progress to be made in our communities. 

I am a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University's Sculpture and Extended Media program which normally surprises people: but I refer to myself as a social sculptor. I am honored to be able to call herself a native Charlottean, and I returned to my hometown to serve as a champion for revolutionary ridiculousness and ecstatic empathy.

I believe in being unapologetically multi-faceted and fearlessly forged in failure: because an uncut diamond may still have value, but it just doesn’t shine the same." 

Learn more about the Charlotte Chapter

Rebecca Henderson, 2017 Fellow from Charlotte, North Carolina

Rebecca Henderson, 2017 Fellow from Charlotte, North Carolina


Katie Beck, 2017 Fellow from Akron, Ohio

Katie Beck, 2017 Fellow from Akron, Ohio

"I’m a strong believer in positivity and going up against the grain. Keeping our morals while motivating and inspiring people. I loved the creative aspect of getting involved with people, instead of just a march or protest, we are spreading love. The experience that people had: they looked forward to coming to our group meetings.

"My favorite intervention is Freedom Flow. We had a Truth-or-Dare dart board, where people were challenged to tell a Truth about themselves or do the Dare like, do a yoga pose or give hugs and high fives from people on the street. One guy started rapping for me after he got the question “ What is something people don’t know about you?” They didn’t expect to interact with each other and there were a lot of smiles and laughs when people learn so much about a stranger in a short period of time. " 

Dray Evans, 2017 Fellow from Akron, Ohio

Dray Evans, 2017 Fellow from Akron, Ohio

"One of the most memorable projects was the Freedom Intervention #freedomflow, where strangers interview each other on camera for 90 seconds. We set up a little movie set and got complete strangers to talk. I remember some people had emotional responses and there were micro relationships formed - at first people were so awkward, saying to each other “I don’t know what I’m doing!” And the other person would say, “I don't know, either,” but after a minute & a half, they were laughing like friends and wanted to hang out later.

After people participate in Interventions, they want to know more about The League. It switched something in their brain about talking with strangers in the community."

Learn more about the Akron Chapter


 
“Everyone has been made for some particular work, and the desire for that work has been put in every heart.”
— Rumi

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Anne Koller